Omar learns about personal space

Is life overwhelming? Add puppies!

linocut of stunned, confused looking Great Dane Harlequin puppy

Detail from “Omar learns about personal space,” hand-colored linocut

Finally, some production, and a new print that I’m pleased with. It’s been a tough winter to get studio work done… Continue reading

Grrr Kitty

The story behind GrrrKitty:

mixed media work of hanging deer carcass and small kitten licking up blood from it

“A Wisconsin Tradition” by S.V. Medaris • 8ft x 6ft • acrylic paint, relief printing and lithography on watercolor paper. More pics at the Consumption Show. (click image to enlarge—and see the kitten)

I was photographing a deer being processed in my neighbor’s front yard. While the humans worked away on this hanging buck, carefully skinning, then cutting the different cuts of venison out, the animals gathered and sat quietly, awaiting their flung piece of meat that was expertly tossed into the waiting mouths of each of the various Weimaraners, and other dogs. The cats however, moved in, and whenever there was an opening, ran forward and settled down to lick up the pooled blood near the buck’s head.

There was this very fierce little kitten, the tiniest kitten I’ve ever seen. Small in stature, but huge in attitude, energy, spirit. I approached her to take her photo, and the highest-pitched, cutest little growl came rumbling out of her venison-filled mouth. She was working on this huge (for her) hunk of deer meat, and as I approached, she glared at me very ferociously, then slammed her tiny puffball of a paw down right next to her meat. Then to the other side “Bam!!” (I’m sure she heard), but it was only a soft, barely perceptible “poof” sound. And the high-pitched growling. I just fell in love with her survivalist, ferocious instinct. She was going to eat her venison and NOBODY was going to touch it.

blockprint of ferocious kitten with text "Grrrrrr"

One of the men working on the deer was taken by her too (everyone was laughing at this outrageously brave little fuzzball), and shortly afterward adopted her and took her home. After watching her thump her paw down first one side, then the other—delineating her space around HER food and keeping out all threats, he called her “Thumper.”

I did a mixed media piece (at top), about 8ft tall, depicting this scene of the huge hanging buck, and the tiny kitten below it, drinking the pooled blood. A fellow grad student at the time said, “If you ever do a t-shirt with that kitten on it, I want it.” Recently, I was finally able to send that t-shirt to him (black on grey t-shirt). And here it is now, in bright colors for the kiddies at the shop!

For now, here is a hodgepodge of kids’ tees—many colors—to see which ones folks like the most, available at the online shop. I will most likely do an edition of kids tees in hot pink + one other color—help decide! Send your votes at any time to info@marketweightpress.com.

Thinking of doing a small edition of GrrrKitty on pink women’s tees…any interest? Want it in an adult size? Let me know what color/size and I’ll see if there’s enough interest in an edition. See the kids t-shirts (below) now at the Market Weight Press shop brightly colored toddler t-shirts block-printed with kitten on front, and Market Weight Press logo (hog) on back

First print of the year…

(Finished in first week of January, but belated posting)

January 15, 2012

For a folio exchange called Everything Eleven (and some A/P ones will be used for my Bestiary), this one’s called:

Eleven Polish Posing

Reduction linocut of White Crested Black Polish, cock

'Eleven Polish Posing' • 3 color reduction linocut with some hand-coloring on Rives Lightweight • 14in x 4in • January 2012

(more than) 11 polish drying

He’s a White Crested Black, cockerel (under 1 year old), all grown up (he is one of my summer 2011 chicks). Quite the beauty, and not too mean as far as these fellows go. I have a bunch of young polish cocks in the barn pen, separate from the coop. When it came time to decide which polish would migrate to the coop (all the pullets and some of the cockerels), this guy was a no-brainer. Although he has about 6 or so other equally handsome brothers of the same breed, when I went to gather up some of “his” girls to take to the coop, he swooped down and tried to grab them (literally) out of my hands. He didn’t try to attack me, but rather tried to grab his girls back. I knew then that I had a good caretaker, mate for those girls, so I swooped him up too. At the very least he would look out for them and not let any of the bigger chickens pick on his girls.

(click any image to enlarge)

8ft chicken is finished and on display…

…at the Overture Center for the Arts.

framed art on wall, with 8ft woodcut chicken in foreground

The show is up! Now on view through June 25th, 2011. Meet the artists at the reception Gallery Night, Friday, May 6, 6pm.

More info: Overture Center, Gallery 1

8ft hand-colored woodcut chicken

Hand- colored woodcut, printed on masa, then mounted on plywood cutout form and varnished. By the way, that's a Golden-Laced Wyandotte, cock. Maximus was one of my first roosters (bros with Big Tiny).

It’s a huge relief to be done with this and have it up on display. I mean it was fun to do, but printing by hand with a wooden spoon (my press is “only” 30in wide….the chicken block is a 4ft x 8ft plywood block) is not easy, especially with so much solid black. An exercise in patience most definitely.

Wyatt, 1 of the dogs of Penland

Wyatt (below), is the first of the critters in my Dogs of Penland book. We’re doing intaglio on plastic/acrylic plates. Pretty much all drypoint. It’s great here at Penland–I can work much of the night and nobody minds. Great facilities and great atmosphere to just get some art done. :)

Wyatt, one of the great dogs of Penland

Wyatt, hand-colored intaglio, 5cm x 8cm

Goedele Peeters is our instructor and she is AMAZING! I feel so lucky to be in her class. She combines intaglio with woodcut and more. Teaching us different ways to do drypoint and combination printing that I didn’t know about before. See her work online at Goedele Peeters.